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Duchess of Cambridge tells Holocaust survivors their stories have stuck with her, in emotional reunion 

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After the call, Mr Goldberg described the moment he had been asked to return to Germany 72 years later to meet the Cambridges, saying: “It was an agonising request because I had not faced any of this for 70 years.  “I had been fortunate in being able to build myself a life, a positive life,…

After the call, Mr Goldberg described the moment he had been asked to return to Germany 72 years later to meet the Cambridges, saying: “It was an agonising request because I had not faced any of this for 70 years. 

“I had been fortunate in being able to build myself a life, a positive life, a forward looking life. I had married a wonderful young lady. We had children, we had grandchildren. And now I was asked to visit this place which used to be hell on Earth. But eventually I felt it was my duty to do so.”

Mr Goldberg saved Mr Shipper’s life by supporting him on the final death march when they were both 15.

Mr Shipper, who survived Auschwitz-Birkenau before being sent to Stutthoff, was raised by his father and grandmother in Łódź, Poland, after his parents divorced, having been told his mother had died.

In 1939 his father escaped to the Soviet Union, believing that it was only young Jewish men who were at risk, and he never saw him again. 

After the war, Mr Shipper got a letter from England written by a Polish woman who was searching for a son and had found his name on a British Red Cross List, asking to check if he had a scar on his left wrist. 

He did and later travelled to England to be reunited with his mother, whom he barely knew. He married and has two daughters, six grandchildren and five great grand-children.

“What a life I have had,” he said. “I would never go anywhere to live.”

“Well I am glad you stayed here Zigi and It’s fantastic you made new friends and a life here,” the Duchess smiled.

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